fbpx

I’ve sea, surfed, and whitewater kayaked for nearly a decade in all conditions, including up to 50 mph winds. I’ve never broken a paddle. Until..

A few years ago, I had rented a sup and paddled casually only a hundred yards, and my paddle broke in half on flat water.

A little taken back, here I was holding both ends, and now with the issue of how to paddle back to shore.

Here’s How to Get Back to Shore:

Paddle Boarders:

  • Paddle boarders – Prone paddling – Get on your chest and paddle with your hands like a surfer.  Or on your knees with both hands. On your chest use alternating hands to propel forward. Kick your feet in the air which helps propel you forward. On your knees both hands learning forward with each stroke.
  • Depending on which side broke, the broken blade can still be used as a shorter paddle. The handle can surprisingly propel you as well.
  • Have your buddy push your board with theirs back to shore – end to end.
  • Have your buddy use their leash or a tow system to haul you back.

Kayakers / Surf Skiers:

  • You can use your hands in the water to proper you forward using an alternative motion
  • Depending on which side broke, the broken blade can still be used as a shorter paddle. The handle can surprisingly propel you as well using a canoe stroke
  • Have your buddy push your board with theirs back to shore – end to end.
  • Have your buddy use their leash or a tow system to haul you back.

Bring Communication:

  • Always carry a waterproofed and tethered communication device like a phone and/or VHF radio.  If the above options don’t work, you can call for help.

About Rob Casey – Named a pioneer in the SUP industry by Stand Up Journal, Rob is the author of “Stand Up Paddling Flat Water to Surf and Rivers” and “Kayaking Puget Sound and the San Juans, 60 Trips.” Rob owns SUP and Kayak school Salmon Bay Paddle in Seattle. He also runs several paddling races.

Salmon Bay Paddle SUP Tips

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This